Courses

BBN-ANM-401 Debate in the Media
Credits: 3
Instructor: Holló Dorottya
Description

BBN-ANM-402 Online Communication
Credits: 3
Instructor: Tartsayné Németh Nóra
Description

BBN-ANM-403 Writing Film Reviews
Credits: 3
Instructor:  Frank Prescott
The purpose of this course is to explore higher level writing skills through a range of topics related to British film and television productions. As well as writing your own critical reviews and essays on current films and televison productions in different styles and formats, there will be a lot of reading to do; mostly articles and reviews but including some theoretical texts as well; and every student will be required to prepare at least one formal presentation lasting around 15 minutes. Students will also be expected to discuss topics actively in class, and there will be an obligatory vocabulary learning requirement of at least 500 new words to be selected from the readings given. You will also be expected to work on improving your style and your language accuracy in terms of grammar and punctuation. This is not just a course for those who like watching and reading about films; it is a writing development course built around the topic of films and film making.

BBN-ANM-404 English in the Arts
Credits: 3
Instructor: Christopher Ryan
Description

BBN-ANM-405 Writing Business Articles
Credits: 3
Instructor: Tiboldi Tímea
Description

BBN-ANM-406 Effective PowerPoint Presentations
Credits: 3
Instructor: Tartsayné Németh Nóra
The course develops presentation skills and focuses on refining students’ presentation skills necessary for success not only in their university studies but also in their future careers. Through a series of shorter assignments, the students will learn to brainstorm, plan, design and deliver effective professional presentations using Powerpoint and Prezi as tools.

BBN-ANM-407 Electronic Media
Credits: 3
Instructor: Frank Prescott
This course will look at the role that the electronic media plays in our world today. The course is intended to encourage a more discriminative approach to the mass media in our everyday lives. We will look at various aspects of the electronic media and use them as a basis for discussion, presentations and writing. It is intended that the course should have a degree of flexibility in its direction and emphasis, and this will be determined by negotiation between students and teacher.

BBN-ANM-408 Media and Advertising
Credits: 3
Instructor: Eitler Tamás
Description

BBN-ANM-409 Fact-based Journalism
Credits: 3
Instructor: Tiboldi Tímea
Description

BBN-ANM-410 Workshop
Credits: 5
Instructor: Tiboldi Tímea
Description

BBN-ANX-300 A Customised Professional Typesetting system: LaTeX
Credits: 3
Instructor:
Description

BBN-ANX-301 A Professional Typesetting System: PlainTeX
Credits: 3
Instructor: Szigetvári Péter
Description

BBN-ANM-503 The BBC
Credits: 3
Instructor: Lojkó Miklós
Description

BBN-ANM-504 Literature in Electronic and Printed Media
Credits: 3
Instructor: Friedrich Judit
Description

BBN-ANM-505 Varieties of English
Credits: 3
Instructor: Starcevic Attila
Description

BBN-ANM-506 Popular Sciences in the Media
Credits: 3
Instructor: Dóczi Brigitta
This course aims to focus on how popular sciences relevant to everyday life are presented in today’s English-speaking media. A further aim is to expand vocabulary and grammar both in speaking and writing through using recent newspaper and magazine articles as well as other types of multimedia material. Language areas covered: development of reading and listening skills, oral presentation skills, argumentative writing skills, textual coherence and the expansion of vocabulary in specific content areas (such as globalization and green issues; technical and scientific development, the philosophy of science etc.)

BBN-ANM-507 The Construction of “Eastern Europeanness” by the Media
Credits: 3
Instructor: Frank Prescott
This new lecture series in the Media Specialization track explores the depiction of Eastern Europeanness in the media. The term has taken on many connotations and many people in this part of the world now prefer not to use it at all preferring the term Central European. What is it? How is it constructed? What are the effects of using it as an umbrella term? How useful or unhelpful is it as a term? The lecture series will draw on texts going back to the post-second world war period to the most recent examples of how “Eastern Europeans” are portrayed in the British media. Since Hungary became a member of the EU, many people have moved to Britain either short- or long-term. We will also look at how the media covers their experiences. Students will also be encouraged to contribute their experiences of being “Eastern European” to the course.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s